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Go Buy Some Clothes
© May 9, 2008, Roy Stucky

I hear you saying how you're
So postmodern but I
Question what you mean.

It seems that nihilism
Simply traded in its
Pantaloons for jeans.

The words you're saying would be
More impressive if they
Were not picked so clean.

Perhaps the book you're reading
Stood on works preceding
"Islands in the Stream".

What you call true is hardly new
Although you didn't know -
Go buy some clothes.

Please note that even Fydor
'Round the Civil War was
Wearied by such lines.

It's nearly funny how your
Latest expert flavor
Can't discern the times.

Your guide to the future's recycled despair
With wisdom too weary to bother to care.
Postmodern ideals are the smoke from the tomb -
A phantom cremation's flame need not consume.

What you call true is hardly new
Although you didn't know -
Go buy some clothes.

When might becomes right then
Everyone is frightened
By each man's design.

When angel nature passion
Falls right out of fashion
Spirits turn to crime.

What you call true is hardly new
Although you didn't know -
Go buy some clothes.
Please drop the pose.
Go buy some clothes.

 


"Because you say, I am rich, and increased with goods, and have need of nothing; and know not that you are wretched, and miserable, and poor, and blind, and naked: I counsel you to buy of me gold tried in the fire, that you may be rich; and white raiment, that you may be clothed, and that the shame of your nakedness not appear; and anoint your eyes with eyesalve, that you may see."
Revelation 3:17-18

"Islands In the Stream" by Hemmingway, which is used here to represent a legacy of hopelessness.

"Fydor" is Fyodor Dostoevsky whose major works were published around the time of the Civil War (1861-1865).
House of the Dead - 1862
Notes from Underground - 1864
Crime and Punishment - 1866
The Gambler - 1867
The Idiot - 1869
The Possessed - 1872
The Brothers Karamazov - 1880

"angel nature passion" is a reference to 'the better angels of our nature' line that closed Lincoln's First Inaugural Address:

"We are not enemies, but friends. We must not be enemies. Though passion may have strained it must not break our bonds of affection. The mystic chords of memory, stretching from every battle-field and patriot grave to every living heart and hearthstone, all over this broad land, will yet swell the chorus of the Union, when again touched, as surely they will be, by the better angels of our nature."