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In Though Expected Out
© November 8, 2007, Roy Stucky

The visor on the helmet opens west into the sky.
The face is full of stars inside inverted sight surprise.
I'm looking into eyes beyond my expectation's reach.
I find that I'm the student though I thought I came to teach.

In though expected out.
What's it all about?
In though expected out.
Found a different route.
In though expected out.

Detect the wisdom looking from the eons down to you.
Connect the pattern engines to the points you thought were true.
The web of earthbound longing traces interwoven dreams
Into the forge of Vulcan beating swords to sharper schemes.

In though expected out.
Found a different route.
In though expected out.
Sure despite the doubt.
In though expected out.

Shadows trace the mortar joints between the things we know.
The interlock in feedback crosstalk sparks before it blows.
The world of our ambition feeds our hunger to forget
Our instruments can't measure what our thoughts do not reflect.

In though expected out.
Sure despite the doubt.
In though expected out.
What's it all about?
In though expected out.

 


Whatever else a good modern feels when he looks at the night sky, he certainly feels that he is looking out-like one looking out from the saloon entrance on to the dark Atlantic or from the lighted porch upon dark and lonely moors. But if you accepted the Medieval Model you would feel like one looking in. The Earth is `outside the city wall'. When the sun is up he dazzles us and we cannot see inside. Darkness, our own darkness, draws the veil and we catch a glimpse of the high pomps within; the vast, lighted concavity filled with music and life.

...

The demand for a developing world-a demand obviously in harmony both with the revolutionary and the romantic temper-grows up first; when it is full grown the scientists go to work and discover the evidence on which our belief in that sort of universe would now be held to rest. There is no question here of the old Model's being shattered by the inrush of new phenomena. The truth would seem to be the reverse; that when changes in the human mind produce a sufficient disrelish of the old Model and a sufficient hankering for some new one, phenomena to support that new one will obediently turn up. I do not at all mean that these new phenomena are illusory. Nature has all sorts of phenomena in stock and can suit many different tastes.

...

It is not impossible that our own Model will die a violent death, ruthlessly smashed by an assault as unprovoked as the nova of 1572. But I think it is more likely to change when, and because, far-reaching changes in the mental temper of our descendants demand that it should. The new Model will not be set up without evidence, but the evidence will turn up when the inner need for it becomes sufficiently great. It will be true evidence. But nature gives most of her evidence in answer to the questions we ask her. Here, as in the courts, the character of the evidence depends on the shape of the examination, and a good cross-examiner can do wonders. He will not indeed elicit falsehoods from an honest witness. But, in relation to the total truth in the witness's mind, the structure of the examination is like a stencil. It determines how much of that total truth will appear and what pattern it will suggest.
C. S. Lewis
The Discarded Image