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Strange Little Secrets
© December 27, 2008, Roy Stucky

A cave in the hillside spans layers of time.
I found it surveying the land I call mine.
Down deep in its memory is cradled a flame
Around which is huddled a traveler gone lame.

The strange little secrets
Of crayon black arts
Leave their marks.

I leave friends and family at rest on the lawn
Too sated to wonder just where I have gone.
From sunshine to shadow I pilot by hand
To grope for the question I don't understand.

The strange little secrets
We hide in our hearts
Burn like sparks.

The stories he tells me make both my ears burn
With longing to know and thus hunger to learn.
I entertain people but never forget
Which passage looks back on that sword silhouette.

The strange little secrets
Of crayon black arts
Leave their marks.

It's time for the grotto and sun to align.
Please open the door to my innermost shrine.
Come sing how a rainbow prefigured a tomb.
Ignite all the stubble the Truth will consume.

The strange little secrets
We hide in our hearts
Burn like sparks.

 


cave = Plato and Epiphany
layers = 1 Corinthians 2:9-12
flame = Secret Flame, I Cor. 3:11-15
traveler = 2 Cor. 5:20
lame = I Kings 18:21
crayon black arts = ancient cave drawings
pilot by hand = grope in the dark, Is. 59:9-10
don't understand = why is there something instead of nothing, Ps. 8:4
both ears = 1 Samuel 3:11
hunger = Matthew 5:6
passage = words in a book
sword = Word of God
silhouette = see through glass darkly
traveler reading Word by fire of Holy Spirit in your heart
grotto = nuance of tide created, crypt, and hiding place
open = Jesus, come into my most hidden places
rainbow prefigured a tomb = covenant not to destroy by water connects to covenant of Messiah
stubble = I Cor. 3:11-15
consume = Rev. 11:5

Idea is that the grotto is to be the tomb of our old man, i.e., the secret is that the carnal man is dead.

strange = Isaiah 55:8

 


Quotations

"Then Pierre felt that deep in him lurked a divine unidentifiableness, that owned no earthly kith or kin. Yet was this feeling entirely lonesome, and orphan-like. Fain, then, for one moment, would he have recalled the thousand sweet illusions of Life; tho’ purchased at the price of Life’s Truth; so that once more he might not feel himself driven out an infant Ishmael into the desert, with no maternal Hagar to accompany and comfort him."
Herman Melville

 


Bibliography

God (forever and ever)
The Holy Bible

Herman Melville (1819-1891)
Pierre (1852)